Shabab 2250

Toward a practical translation for the UN resolution 2250: youth, peace, and security

“The youth of today need all of you. You are the policymakers, who can impact world peace and security, and the decision makers, who can partner with young people in building efforts, instead of leaving them as a target of violence and destruction. Your generation is also in charge of drawing up education, development and economic policies”. HRH Crown Prince Al Hussein Bin Abdullah II

 

The UNr2250 was presented the first time during the opening debate of the Security Council on the Role of Youth in Countering Violent Extremism and Promoting Peace on 23 April 2015 by the HRH Crown Prince Al Hussein Bin Abdullah II. In addition to, announcing hosting the first Global Forum on Youth, Peace, and Security between 21-22 August 2015 in Madaba, where “Amman Declaration” was formulated and announced by youth.

On 9 Dec. 2015, the UN Security Council adopted the UN resolution 2250 (2015); which defines youth as persons aged between 18 and 29 years old, and the Security Council urged the Member States to consider setting up mechanisms that would enable young people to participate meaningfully in peacebuilding and dispute resolution efforts.

 

Importance of the UNr2250

“It is part of the long term envisioned solutions that is based on a positive behavioural change which is actioned into daily life towards enabling pluralistic communities”. I Dare for Sustainable Development

It highlights the real partnership and effective role for youth in building sustainable peace and security. The UNr2250 stresses the importance of recognizing the pivotal role youth can play in preventing violent extremism, building and sustaining peace and security. Youth are able and keen to shape a brighter future which takes into consideration a holistic and a responsible role towards sustainable development.

According to the “Regional Framework of Joint Strategic Actions for Young People 2016 – 2017 in the Arab States/Middle East and North Africa Region” report; around 29% of the population in the Arab States/MENA region falls in the age group between 10 and 24 years old. One of the main persisting challenges facing the entire region is political instability, long-term conflicts, and war.

At least, ten countries are in conflict or are neighbours to countries which are already in a conflict. Furthermore, the conflict in the region had a devastating effect on schools’ attendance; more than 13 million children are not attending school. The same challenges are also devastating the problem of unemployment among youth which is the highest in the world; 28.2% in the Middle East and 30.5% in North Africa in 2014 also, with considerable variations between countries. Therefore, the UNr2250 is being regarded as a roadmap to building on the positive potential of young people in promoting peace and security; which is promoting peaceful and inclusive societies (Sustainable Development Goal 16).

 

Main points of UNr2250:

“I think we are living in a world where we see a multiplication of new conflicts, and you see an enormous difficulty in solving the conflicts.” Antonio Guterres

 

1. Participation:

  • Increasing youth participation at all levels of the decision-making process.
  • Taking into consideration youth participation and views in peace negotiation and agreements.
  • Supporting and empowering youth peace initiatives.

 

2. Protection:

  • Protecting young civilians’ lives and human rights in contexts of armed conflicts.
  • Protection against sexual and gender-based violence.
  • Investigating and prosecuting crimes committed against young civilians.

 

3. Prevention:

  • Creation of youth-friendly and inclusive policies through an enabling environment for youth participation.
  • Supporting youth participation in peacebuilding.
  • Providing quality peace education.
  • Promotion of a culture of peace, tolerance, intercultural and interreligious dialogue.

 

4. Partnerships:

  • Increasing the political, financial, technical, and logistical support for the participation of youth in peace efforts.

 

5. Disengagement & Reintegration:

  • Youth employment opportunities to counter marginalization.
  • Investing in building youth capabilities and skills.
  • Supporting youth entrepreneurship initiatives.

 

 Amman Declaration:

“What we are witnessing of the depletion of the energies and potentials of young people, especially during the armed conflicts, and this what have made us to stress in the draft of the resolution, the role of youth in conflict prevention through urging all Member States to provide a motivating environment and to develop policies and mechanisms to enable youth to contribute effectively to peace-building and the promotion of culture peace, tolerance and respect for religions”. Ambassador Dina Kawar, Permanent Representative of Jordan to the United Nations

The Amman Youth Declaration, drafted in consultation with over eleven thousand youth from around the world and supported by the Government of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, United Nations system and representatives of the civil society, presents a “common vision and roadmap towards a strengthened policy framework to support youth in transforming conflict, preventing and countering violence and building sustainable peace.”The Amman Youth Declaration was the outcome of the Global Forum, that took place between 21 and 22 of August 2015 in Jordan, which brought together 500 government officials, policy experts, youth-led organizations, and young peace builders from over 100 countries aimed at helping to shape a new international agenda on youth, peace, and security.

The declaration highlights four key areas where young people’s input and engagement must be sought by the international community: 

  1. Meaningful participation and leadership in decision and policy-making around peace and security;
  2. Recognition and support of youth networks, organizations and individual initiatives in preventing violence and violent extremism and promoting peace;
  3. Promotion and protecting the rights of girls and prevention of gender-based violence; and
  4. Prioritizing investing in youth socio-economic development.

 

Project Phases:

  1. Technical capacity building for youth on three levels; knowledge, skills, and attitudes. 
  2. To go through the A.C.T approach through the experiential learning process; Acquire, Create, Transform:

 

  • Acquire; new knowledge, skills, and attitudes;
  • Create; youth-led initiatives within their own local realities;
  • Transform; youth will be able to be part of the positive transformation process for themselves and their own local communities.

 

  1. Youth Innovation Hubs (YIH): designing and implementing youth initiatives within local communities. 
  2. Creation of a network of empowered and active youth. 
  3. Contributing to the interactive platform idareact.org 
  4. Providing a training kit and other useful educational tools for self-directed learning.

 

    

Disclaimer: The information and views set out in this Project web page are those of the author I Dare for Sustainable Development organization and do not necessarily reflect the official opinion of the European Union. Neither the European Union institutions and bodies nor any person acting on their behalf may be held responsible for the use which may be made of the information contained therein.